Trading Gridlock for Slow and Steady Rhythms

IMG_8206Driving back to my hotel after a day spent just outside Washington, D.C. at a work conference, I needed to get on the Beltway and go South. I had been dreading this particular stretch all day, knowing I’d be up against the D.C. commuters returning home in rush hour on a Friday, a Friday which, for many, was also the start of spring break. Not even on the Beltway yet, I could see its ripple effects on the on-ramps and even spilling up onto the highway where I was, cars already at a standstill.

Ignoring Siri’s insistence to get into the right lane to begin merging, I believed there must be another way. A slower way. I glanced at my anticipated arrival time.

6:09 pm.

I continued on the slow, steady highway, and sure enough, Siri rerouted — this time, to a toll road. Again, I held out for a slower way, and she recalculated, making small adjustments to keep my commute moving forward.

Suddenly and without warning, my lane became a right-turn-only lane, and I was forced to ease off of the highway onto a side street. My steady road had ended, and without knowing my way, I planned to make a U-turn, but Siri had other plans. She recognized another route, and I continued forward.

This newest route wound through sleepy neighborhoods, a mixture of older homes and McMansions, the off-street parking so tight, the roads appeared one-way. Still, I was grateful for this quieter unplanned route, and I continued to weave through the stop signs and quiet streets. Eventually, the road spit me back onto the main highway leading to my hotel, with only a stop sign against a steady stream of traffic in both directions, and with an additional two-way cross-street between me and the stop sign to the main thoroughfare.

Finally, my opportunity came, and I darted into the first available lane and then watched for opportunities to get over. I persisted and was soon swinging into one of the last parking spots in front of the hotel. I breathed a sigh of relief, my car finally in park, and glanced at the clock.

6:07 pm. Earlier even, than the Beltway would have delivered me.

The route I took had its own unique obstacles, but it was another way, albeit the uncommon way. And in this case, uncommon meant less-congested. When I felt gridlocked in traffic, I sought a new direction, a slower, quieter route.

I’ve been practicing this in my life for several years now as well, and I know this season with three little ones, working a full-time job, and now publishing my first children’s book will not last forever. I’m learning as I go, stepping out in faith. My responsibilities, while all good, do not leave wiggle room for much else, and that is both frustrating and stressful.

Tonight I finished Emily P. Freeman’s “Discern and Decide” course, one of her pre-order bonuses accompanying her latest book, “The Next Right Thing,” a national bestseller just days after launch. I loved diving deep into exploring the rhythms I’ve established in this season, reflecting on what is and isn’t working. I love the suggestions Emily gave for how to reflect on the past season. An avid writer, I didn’t think I needed this extra direction, but her practical suggestions encouraged me to reflect on things I might otherwise have missed. Breaking down my personal and communal practices, I was able to highlight rhythms to ingrain and rhythms to abandon. Instead of feeling guilt over the places where I’ve said “no” lately, I felt affirmed. My decisions lately have aligned with what I value most.

I fought for the space to have time of reflection this weekend. Here I am, at a hotel, sans kiddos for the first time in years. When I first asked if I could go on this work trip, I was met with resistance. My admin said there was no money. I decided to pay for it myself, and in the meantime, found funding another way. My husband, of course, was supportive of my going, but it meant a lot of sacrifices on both of our parts. I’d miss my oldest son’s school recital and my middle son’s soccer game, and I’d have to pump milk for the days spent away from my youngest. It also meant several hours of writing lesson plans for my substitute. Meanwhile, my husband was doing 100% of the things.

But I persisted, knowing I needed the time to slow down, and so here I am, relishing the white space I carved for myself. I’ve had time for uninterrupted thought, uninterrupted writing, and mostly-uninterrupted quiet. (There was that charter bus of middle schoolers just outside my door that pulled in and unloaded at 11:45 last night…)

Today I went to a huge shopping center and perused slowly — another luxury I’ve never had. At my conference today, I talked to an author I’ve followed for 13 years now. (Check out @counselorstation on Instagram today to see who she is!) I tried a new face mask. I moved slowly and finished entire thoughts. For once, I didn’t have to leave unfinished projects scattered around. I savored my coffee and strawberry crepes in a quaint little French cafe.

The small adjustments Siri made so that I didn’t have to join the gridlock on the Beltway are not unlike the small adjustments I make in my life to stay balanced, avoiding a gridlocked schedule but also recognizing that a kid-free retreat will not always be realistic. I learned from my “How Things Work” college physics professor that a bicycle can stay balanced on its own if it’s pedaled (he was making the point that it’s not all that impressive when people ride a bike without touching the handlebars). I like to think that pedaling with these tiny, almost unnoticeable adjustments helps keep it balanced. Right now I’m pedaling between these two extremes, the gridlock and the quiet. And I’m finding where I can dip into each, covering my responsibilities and saying no as needed, while also taking time for self-care. But if I lean too far into either one, I become unbalanced and something major gets neglected.

The steady rhythm of moving forward, listening for cues from the Lord, being open to consider unexpected opportunities, and seeking out those uncommon paths help keep me from falling. I’m grateful for it all.

Navigating the Messy Middle

this tension -- wanting to pursue my calling, but having to surrender something else in order to do so.

Do you ever feel restless to move?

Is it to a new home? A new job? A new city or town? Do you need a mindset shift? A new perspective? A new workout routine?

Who is moving? Is it you who needs to move, or is time to finally acknowledge that God is moving in your life, making big changes and offering to shoulder your insecurities and self-doubts?

Perhaps my word “move” for the year is drawing me from my own sense of security and allowing Him to move within me.

God,

You filled me with awe in worship this week. I want to surrender to your call, but I fear losing the security I’ve worked for. Some people earn degrees and never fully use them in the field they intended; I fear stopping too early. I know I can use my education moving forward, regardless of what I do, my knowledge and experiences will alway be a part of me. God, why am I put in this tension — wanting to pursue my calling, but having to surrender something else in order to do so. It feels like I have to let go of one thing to switch to another, letting go of one trapeze and trusting that I’ll catch the next — and I’m afraid of flying. I want to serve more fully with the gifts you’ve laid upon me. I am in the mess of this tension every day and I do feel anxious and restless about it. I don’t have time to myself to devote long stretches to what I love doing. I can’t even schedule time and guard it — I have three small boys and a full-time job! I have to accept time where it comes organically, and that unpredictability is stressful for me. I can’t be creative on a schedule, anyway. When the mood strikes, I might be nursing a tiny human on my lap or teaching a class at school. I may wake up early, and my kids wake up minutes later. I know you will make a way because it is your will for me, I’ve seen you do it over the past year as you’ve opened many doors for me (and closed even more), and I am so thankful for all of it. Amen.

Right now I feel like I’ve found a “partial solution,” as Tsh Oxenreider calls it, but I also feel like I can only commit partially, even though I want to give my all–thus the tension I’m constantly mulling over in the back of my mind. My pastor recently encouraged us to ask ourselves how we can lean on our church to pursue God’s call.

This is probably one of the hardest parts for me. It isn’t that I intentionally put walls up. It’s just my personality makes it difficult for me to process things out loud with others — I process quietly –internally– and usually through writing. Inviting someone into my mess means attempting to sort through jumbled thoughts before I’ve had a chance to make any sort sense of them. As my uncle says, I’ve always held my cards very close to my chest, and I’ll admit to this. It has always made it harder for me to ask for help and it makes people assume things come easily for me, which drives me crazy because it couldn’t be further from the truth. Usually by the time I share something, I’ve had quite a bit of time to pray over it and wrestle with it, and I’d rather just share things with a few close friends, anyway.

Jennie Allen writes, “Because he didn’t call us to something alone. He carries the yoke for us, so we can run with power” (Restless, p. 147). When I am not ready to invite others in to the mess (even though I know I need to, that vulnerability fosters connections and relationships), I know that I can count on God to meet me, already knowing the details of my mess, reassuring me that He also knows how it will all unfold.

So for now, I’ll continue to pray through this messy middle and try to encourage others to join me in this tension.

For more reflections on my one word for 2019, “move,” check out my two previous posts:

My One Word for 2019: Move

Knowing How to Step Out in Faith

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Knowing How to Step Out in Faith

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When my husband and I were first interested in getting a Prius for our new family vehicle, suddenly, they were everywhere.

Every time I was pregnant, or wanted to be, or had just miscarried a precious life, it seemed like there were pregnant women everywhere.

With blinders on, with intense focus on something, we tend to notice it more.

Only two months into 2019, I see and hear the word “move” everywhere– in books, music, scripture, sermons, and podcasts. I know in part, it’s because it’s the word I’ve chosen to pray over and reflect upon this year. But I also know God placed this word on my heart in the same way that He has placed a calling in my heart and His Spirit in my soul to tend it, and He is continuing to encourage me by revealing a deeper study of what it means to really move toward Him.

My journal lately is starting to sound like a broken record as I continue to revisit the same tensions in my quiet time. I may not have my own expectations for exactly what “move” will mean for me this year, but I also know that my wonder and unknowing is what will stir me to lean on Him for direction.

In Restless: Because you were made for more, Jennie Allen writes about God moving to meet us, willing to meet us as far as we jump, multiplying what we give Him as He did with the loaves and fishes. (This also reminded me of a beautiful essay written by my dear friend Christina, “He Makes Much Out of Little.”)

How can I serve the community where I am right now? How can I stop trying to guard the security I’ve come to know in order to step out in faith?

Lord,

Thank you for the gift of time You provide for me to listen. Thank you for where I am right now and being willing to move to meet me, whether I stay or go, whether I give a little or give much. I know you will take what I can offer. Help me to see where I can serve right now. Help me to share my gifts in the places where you’ve intentionally placed me right now, instead of always questioning whether I’m in the right place. I can serve my community right here. Thank you for this renewed perspective and mindset shift. I can look at where I am though the lens of gratitude and service. Amen. 

If you ever feel guilty for just craving alone time to indulge in self-care and uninterrupted reflection on pursuing the next steps God is calling you toward, I’d be honored if you’d head over to Kindred Mom to read my essay published on Kindred Mom this week, Seeking Solitude in the Midst of Motherhood.

For more thoughts on my one word for 2019, “move,” you can find my recent essay one post back.

 

 

My One Word for 2019: Move

png (1).pngA recurring respite awaits me, unassuming, in the middle of my week. I didn’t find it until this past fall, when my son began piano lessons. The cozy den where I wait during his lesson is warm and inviting, the L-shaped sectional welcoming me back week after week. Worship music plays from a small boombox on the bottom shelf of a curated bookcase of Bibles and devotionals. A soothing candle is usually nestled onto the farmhouse coffee table, but today in its place squatted a small jar of Hershey Kisses, some last remnants of the holidays. I’ve joked with my son’s piano teacher that I would pay her the same amount she charges per lesson in exchange for the solitude of this room for 30 minutes a week, even if there was no lesson.

As the lesson began over in the music room, I thought about the rhythm I’ve created for this quiet time. I had gotten into a pattern of fitting writing and silent worship into these 30 minutes, but today I thought I might be too nervous to write as I carefully poured over some notes instead, notes I’ve been preparing for months for an interview tomorrow.

Somewhere between the steady beat of the worship music, flipping through my notes, and the labored piano notes of my six-year-old’s lesson on the other side of the wall, I found myself overcome, succumbing instead to prayer. Had there been room, I might have even dropped to my knees, but the couch afforded plenty of space to feel His presence.

I felt gripped, tethered on a fast-moving train, the pull of God’s call almost dizzying me even as I tried to sort out the scenery rushing past, everything I’ve ever done in my life leading up this moment, this new track being laid out before me. I pray for this door to be opened, that tomorrow will shed clarity onto the blur of the track before me.

My word for 2019 is “move.” God gifted me this word to steward and then pulled me along when I was least expecting it tonight. I have a lot of ideas of what “move” could mean for me this year, and I will continue to pray that God will guide me toward where He’s calling me with this word.

I should have known God would meet me here, as He does week after week.

Only this time, there was chocolate.

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Did you pray for a word this year? I’d love for you to share your word below.

 

Releasing Worry Over Circumstances We Cannot Control

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I needed a release more than I knew. I realized it today in a small 4′ x 4′ dressing room on the second floor of the hospital, where my trembling arms cinched the ties of a deep pink hospital shirt, the color of hope. The color of strength. The color of fear.

My shaking hand signed the paperwork minutes before. My stint in the waiting room wasn’t long enough, much preferring to be there over learning of any new news back in the exam room. Older women sitting around me complained of their grown children’s entitlement at holidays, but all I could hear was their bitterness. I wondered if this was how they avoided bigger worries, the sort that brought them to this particular waiting room on the second floor of the hospital, here in the cancer center.

Someone outside my dressing room talked about her breast cancer diagnosis at 35. A concerned nurse asked me if my doctor talked to me about early mammograms. I wondered if she knew something I didn’t, if her question was actually a suggestion, though my insurance policy doesn’t agree.

“Hop up on the stretcher here,” the tech instructed as we entered the tiny exam room. Her tone was warm. I recognized her from every other time I’ve been here and was relieved that I wouldn’t be going through this ultrasound alone.

Lying on my back, I breathed slowly and methodically. In this supine position, the tears could only pool unless I allowed myself to release them. I counted tiles– six across, six down. Another square room, this whole place just a grid within the hospital, with all news delivered in the style of Russian roulette.

The news came quickly. The tumor had disappeared in a year’s time. At the sight of my tears, my tech was quick to reassure me that although it might have just shrunk, it would never turn into cancer. She didn’t actually use that formidable word, she strategically used the word “anything.” I knew what she implied. She made a few jokes trying to ease the burden of my spilling tears. She assumed they came from a place of relief for the good news, and I suppose they did. I had kept them at bay, all the worry I hadn’t allowed myself to dwell on in the midst of holiday busyness, work obligations, and all that accompanies motherhood. I hadn’t allowed myself to think about it for 367 days, the span since the last time I was here.

But this release would have come regardless of whether the news was good or bad. All the worry my body had been carrying gave way in the knowing. This news meant that I could still nurse my baby, that my own body had not betrayed me. In those short moments before the doctor walked in, I had finally allowed myself to consider every possible scenario, and I was scared.

I looked at the ultrasound and thought what a slap in the face it is that ultrasounds can be used to deliver both good news and heartache. It was an ultrasound that first informed me that I had lost my first pregnancy. Other ultrasounds allowed me to see healthy, growing baby boys. And this very wand would detect a tumor and then, a year later, lose track of it.

“One act of thanksgiving made when things go wrong is worth a thousand when things go well.” – John the Cross as quoted by Madeleine L’Engle in “Walking on Water,” 156.

Back in my car, my head throbbed. My heart ached despite the best news I could have gotten today, and for that news, I am so thankful. I’m grateful for my doctor and tech with wonderful bedside manner. I can only imagine them having to sit alongside women going through so much more than I’ve had to go through, reassuring women with much bigger fears and problems than I have. But they also made me feel as if my concern was not insignificant. It wasn’t unnoticed. And it was unfair and worrisome. It’s my burden to deal with, but ultimately it’s not my burden to carry.

It has always, always been God’s burden. It was there in God’s hands before I ever noticed it. and He will keep his hand on it even when technology can’t find it.

In an hour, it was all over. Suddenly, I’m desperate to get home to coffee and warmth and to get out of this cold December rain. Carrying an umbrella through the cancer center parking lot on the way in felt ridiculous; raindrops were the least of my concerns. But gripping that umbrella was within the realm of my control when everything else was not.

Today I expected to wake up and wrap presents all day. Instead, I spent the morning in much-needed prayer, filled with both worship and worry. I overheard my six-year-old explaining to my four-year-old why I had to go to the hospital this morning, that I have bumps near my milk that I have to get checked. That was the best way I could explain it to him so that he wouldn’t worry but also know that this was something important for mommy to get checked out, so that one day when he’s a dad, he can support his wife if she ever has to go through this. Or hold his own daughter’s hand and let her know that she’s not alone even when it feels that way. That God is always with her and that she is always, always prayed over. God will hold onto our worries until we are ready to release them completely.